Bristol lateBreaks

BRISTOL HOTEL DEALS

BOOK DIRECT

Above we have listed a selection of Hotels that offer incentives to guests for booking direct with the hotel.
Below we have a selection of hotels using major comparison sites.

COMPARE BRISTOL HOTELS

Bristol Marriott Royal Hotel

Most popular facilities

Free WiFi
Family rooms
Fitness center
Restaurant
Non-smoking rooms
Facilities for disabled guests
Bar

Hampton by Hilton Bristol City Centre

Most popular facilities

Free WiFi
Family rooms
good Fitness Center
Non-smoking rooms
Facilities for disabled guests
24-hour front desk
Tea/Coffee Maker in All Rooms
Bar

Future Inn Bristol

Most popular facilities

Free WiFi
Family rooms
Free parking
Restaurant
Non-smoking rooms
Facilities for disabled guests
Tea/Coffee Maker in All Rooms
Bar

Radisson Blu Hotel, Bristol

Most popular facilities

Free WiFi
Family rooms
Restaurant
Non-smoking rooms
Facilities for disabled guests
Room service
Bar

Mercure Bristol Holland House

Most popular facilities

Free WiFi
Family rooms
Fitness center
Restaurant
Non-smoking rooms
Facilities for disabled guests
Bar

Holiday Inn Express Bristol City Centre

Most popular facilities

Parking
Free WiFi
Pet friendly
Family rooms
Non-smoking rooms
Facilities for disabled guests
Tea/Coffee Maker in All Rooms
Bar

BRISTOL BREAKS

Bristol has a lot to offer as a tourist destination as well as an excellent base in exploring the West Country.  The up and coming domination of urbanization and a touch of being a historic English county and city combination makes this side of the world worth appreciating.

This largest city and smallest county in Southwest England is situated 120 miles west of London.  Bristol has been politically administered for various times by Somerset and Gloucestershire.  During Saxon times, Bristol grew at the confluence of the Avon and Frome rivers.  A bridge was built and the settlement was known as Brycgstow which literally means a place of bridge”.  History would tell us that they came up with the name Bristol because of the local dialect that caused an ‘L’ to be added to the end of this.  Bristol also reflects a fascinating industrial and maritime heritage that is still ongoing.  The sheltered waters of the Bristol Channel where the River Severn meets the sea give them the advantage of being a maritime center.  For thousand of years, the city has been a seaport.  Some warehouse and tall cranes are now symbol of there past because pleasure boats, swish apartments and cool drinking dens replaced the barges, docks and old warehouses as the city advances.

In Bristol’s early days, the city was bounded by walls and rivers and land in Bristol was always at premium. This has caused structures like hospitals, friaries and monasteries to be built outside the walls on sites granted by local land-owners.

As proof of Bristol’s rich history, there are various landmarks that are truly fascinating to every sight.  Some of the structures even have interesting things within them that own might miss at the first glance.  These are markers, grotesque carvings, the nails, and Bewell’s cross among others that has some significance or history.  If you are interested with things above eye level, then you might find yourself fascinated upon walking through the streets of Bristol.

Free-standing sculptures and statues had also been Bristol’s pride but because of the poor record of keeping of their possession, the city lost the High Cross which was given away in 1768 and the Chatterton Column was allowed to decay and removed in 1967.  One noticeable masterpiece is the equestrian bronze by Rysbrack of William III which stands in Queen Square.  It is the most famous piece among Bristol’s statues.  The statue of Neptune was also a familiar sight at the head of St. Augustine’s Reach.  Originally, the structure was set up in the Temple area, near Bristol Bridge.

One famous landmark in Bristol is the Clifton Suspension Bridge.  This must see feature spans the spectacular Avon gorge.  The 19th century suspension bridge is always opens and is free to walk across with 50 pence to drive over.

The city also boasts one of its architectural masterpieces, an abbey that became a cathedral in 1542.  The Bristol Cathedral is the finest ecclesiastical building in the city.
Apart from physical magnificence of the city, entertainment is also well-boasted by Bristolians.  The city is even making a bid to become the 2008 European Capital of Culture.

Shellfish, crabs and lobster lovers can always find there place here with seafood restaurants sprouting in the city.  There are also several bars and restaurants that suit all taste and budget.  Several choices can be seen around Harbourside, The West End’s Park Street and Whiteladies Road.

Bristol Cream Sherry, Bristol Blue Glass and the “Bristol Sound” are among the trademark of the city’s world class product. If you’re in Bristol, you shouldn’t miss to drop buy and shop at the elegant shops that offer designer clothes, art and crafts, jewelry and antiques.  That’s Broadmead Center mall-style out-of-town shopping with big names in one roof.

Accommodation is not a problem when visiting Bristol.  Buses are the best way to get to and from the airport into the city.  The Bristol International Flyer links the airport, Bristol Temple Meads railway station and Bristol bus station.  However, there is no train station at the airport.  The two major train stations is found in Temple Meads and Parkway.  The former serves Cardiff to London Paddington Line while the latter for River Avon

Find flights to Bristol United Kingdom and compare hotel prices with major airlines and travel agents.

Other City Breaks in Europe

TOURIST INFORMATION