Murcia lateBreaks

MURCIA HOTEL DEALS

BOOK DIRECT

Above we have listed a selection of Hotels that offer incentives to guests for booking direct with the hotel.
Below we have a selection of hotels using major comparison sites.

COMPARE MURCIA HOTELS

Hotel Las Gaviotas

Most popular facilities

1 swimming pool
Parking
Free WiFi
Family rooms
Restaurant
Bar

Las Lomas Village – Luxury Apartments

Most popular facilities

2 swimming pools
Free parking
Spa
Free WiFi
Family rooms
Bar
Private beach area

Hotel Los Delfines

Most popular facilities

1 swimming pool
Free WiFi
Family rooms
Restaurant
Facilities for disabled guests
Bar

Caleia Mar Menor Golf & Spa Resort

Most popular facilities

1 swimming pool
Spa
Pet friendly
Parking
Free WiFi
Bar

Doubletree By Hilton La Torre Golf & Spa Resort

Most popular facilities

1 swimming pool
Free parking
Free WiFi
Tea/Coffee Maker in All Rooms
Bar

La Manga Club Hotel Príncipe Felipe

Most popular facilities

1 swimming pool
Free parking
Free WiFi
Family rooms
Restaurant
Bar
Private beach area

MURCIA BREAKS

Tired of waking up to the sounds of the city?

Wake up to the call of Murcia’s tranquil breeze.  This is a picturesque city in southeastern Spain. It is supposedly a municipality perched by the river Segura. The capital of the Autonomous Community of the Region of Murcia, the city is home to 409,810 permanent residents.

Murcia is sprawled in the heart of the plains, called the huerta or the market garden of Murcia.  It hosts the Seguran valleys and the river Sangonera. The city is also surrounded by beautiful mountains and situated in proximity of the ocean. Notwithstanding its ideal geographic location, Murcia possesses a climate of extreme variations. If one visits the city during the summer months, the summer heat is said to be so severe that one can only do so much as take as many siestas. Frosts too are sometimes felt in during the cold season of winter in the capital.

Murcia’s first name is said to be Medinat Mursiya derived from the Arab emir of Al-Andalus, Abd ar-Rahman II.  The Arabs were the original settlers of the olden-day Murcia.  Accordingly, these great thinkers from the Middle East saw the potential of the course of the river Segura, decided to create a network of complex channels that transformed the town into a thriving one with the system becoming the forerunner of the contemporary irrigation system. The rule of these people, however, was not meant to last as history would show many people trying to conquer the mesmerizing city. But the Castilians, spearheaded by King Alfonso X, were the ones to eventually subdued and ruled Murcia. This happened in1304 by virtue of the Treaty of Torrellas when Murcia was finally incorporated into Castile, the Spain we know today.

Cathedral of the Diocese of Cartagena-Murcia said to be built between 1394 and 1465 in Castilian Gothic style holds a tower, only done in 1792, reveals a variety of styles. The first two stories are in Renaissance style while the third one is Baroque. Finally, the bell pavilion is said to have been inspired by the Rococo and Neoclassical techniques. The foremost façade, on the other hand, is considered a masterpiece of the Spanish Baroque style.

Other significant structures in the square fronting the Cathedral, known as the Plaza Cardenal Belluga, include the charming park itself, the interesting Bishops palace and the well-known extension to the town hall said to be done by Rafael Moneo.

As the old Murcia is covered mostly with walking areas, centered on Platería and Trapería Streets, the city is perfect for romantic or family strolls while sightseeing. The Trapería Street stretches from the Cathedral to what used to be the olden times’ market square, today’s Plaza de Santo Domingo.

One could also visit the Casino located in the same street. The building served as a social club when it was built in 1847. It features a luxurious interior that includes a Moorish-style patio inspired by the Alhambra royal rooms. This only proves how much the Spanish city preserved its Arab influences.

What makes Murcia famous throughout Spain is its Holy Week processions that will not only take a participant on a spiritual journey but also on a cultural extravaganza. Taken out of museums are the life-sized sculptures by Francisco Salzillo. These are then carried around the city in stylish processions full of flowers and, at night, candles. The delicately detailed figures feature a portrayal of events leading up to and including the crucifixion. However, the most vibrant celebrations only happen the week after Holy Week when Murcians dress in time-honored huertano garments to mark Bando de la Huerta. Happening also a week after is the Entierro de la Sardina or the Burial of the Sardine pageant. The citizenry at this time completely jams the city streets for an all-night party and live dances.

With so much art and culture in this quaint city, it is no wonder that the economy of the region around Murcia is turning towards “residential tourism” in which many Europeans especially those coming from the north are now making their homes in cheerful Murcia.

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